About your Search

20130201
20130228
STATION
KNTV (NBC) 18
WBAL (NBC) 15
WRC (NBC) 15
LANGUAGE
English 48
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and this president has made unprecedented use of them. nbc news has obtained a government document that lays out the legal argument to justify the president's use of drones to kill al qaeda suspects, including, in some cases, u.s. citizens. our national investigative correspondent michael isikoff broke the story and has our report. >> reporter: drones have been called president obama's weapon of choice. during his four years as commander in chief, u.s. military and cia drone strikes have accelerated at an unprecedented pace. more than 400 cia strikes against targets in pakistan and yemen. eight times as many as under president bush. >> they have been very precise, precision strikes against al qaeda and their affiliates. >> these strikes are legal. they are ethical. and they are wise. >> reporter: but today, new questions about drone strikes targeting american citizens, including anwar al awlaki. born in new mexico and killed in yemen in 2011. he allegedly directed the so-called underwear bomber, who tried to blow up an airliner over detroit in 2009. but awlaki was never charged with a crime. nbc
, not as many as hoped for or expected. nbc's tom costello starts us off in our washington newsroom tonight with what all of this might mean. tom, good evening. >> hi, brian. the good news, anyone with retirement money invested in stocks has made back much of what they lost during the great recession and the wall street selloff, about $8 trillion. a big rally on wall street today, with the dow back over 14,000. a lot has changed since the last time it crossed that mark on october 12th, 2007. within a year, lehman brothers and bear stearns failed. housing prices went off a cliff. the unemployment rate went from 4.7% to 10% before falling back to 7.9% today. in portland, oregon this week, more than 900 people applied for 160 new jobs at two new hardware stores. >> 80% of the people we saw were -- had been out of work for three months to up to two years. >> reporter: julie ober has been out of work for 16 months. >> my last job was front desk at a pain management company. and just -- i actually got sick. and couldn't be there any longer. >> reporter: nationwide, some 12 million americans are s
. >> the president should be calling us over somewhere, camp david, the white house, somewhere and us sitting down and trying to avert these cuts. >> reporter: but even within the republican party, many are questioning how bad the cuts will be, accusing you the president of exaggerating the consequences. >> to not cut 2.5% out of the total budget over a year when it's twice the size it was ten years ago, give me a break. >> reporter: still, at this ship yard in norfolk, virginia, 1600 letters warning of possible pink slips are already in the mail, while workers wait for washington to act. >> guys really need to put their heads together and figure something out. >> you know, they take this away, a lot of people are going to be hurt. >> reporter: a looming crisis underxbird virginia's republican governor. >> sequester was put in place to be a hammer, not a policy. now here we are a week away. find another way to do it and get it done now. >> reporter: tonight, many of the nation's governors were actually here at the white house for a formal dinner with the president. lester, even among those governo
fingers. we elected them to be responsible. >> reporter: the president has used every political weapon in his arsenal to raise public fears over the sequester. for the second day in a row, his homeland security secretary expressed concern about safety. >> i've been in government and public service a long time, a long time, 20 years almost. i have never seen anything like this. >> reporter: attorney general eric holder was equally pessimistic. >> the reality is that there is going to be harm, there is going to be pain and the american people are going to be less safe. >> reporter: the president's pr offensive is not playing well among republicans on capitol hill, where tempers flared again today. >> we have moved the bill in the house twice. we should not have to move a third bill before the senate gets off their ass and begins to do something. >> reporter: as for what's sinking in with the public, a new nbc news/"wall street journal" poll indicates growing reservation about the sequester. 52% call it a bad idea. just 21% believe it's a good one. but overall, cutting spending is a popul
the u.s. postal service says delivering the mail on saturdays must stop. if they are to survive. it's one of two american institutions in the news tonight for differing reasons in changing times. we want to begin tonight with nbc's tom costello in glen echo, maryland. tom, good evening. >> reporter: hi, brian, no secret the postal service is up to its neck in red ink, handling 30 billion fewer pieces of first class mail today than just four years ago. and guess what? delivery of packages booming because we're all buying stuff online. this action is about just trying to keep the lights on. for people all over america, like 71-year-old lois sexton in tennessee, that mailbox at the end of the driveway has been a reliable connection to the rest of the world. >> that's my communication with the people i have my retirement with, my social security. >> reporter: since 1863, six days a week, rain or shine, letters, bills, government checks, newspapers, even movies, have arrived, even on saturday. now the 21st century with its e-mail, e-cards and e-pay, has come knocking. >> we cannot put ou
, but tell us the damn truth for what you know. we haven't heard anything truthful yet, to my knowledge. >> reporter: as the ship crept closer to port, passengers' desperation became visible. signs made from bed sheets read "s.o.s." and "help us." on board, donna gutsman told us, there is much confusion. >> very little has been right on time, or on point. so we're having a hard time. >> reporter: gutzman took these photos showing the improvised tent city earlier this week, where passengers slept on the sun deck after the power went out. soaked hallways and the plastic bags used in place of toilets. >> there's sewer on the floors. there's -- peeing and pooping in buckets and putting the bags outside our door. >> reporter: other photos show passengers in hallways on lower decks and efforts to keep cell phones juiced on limited power. gutzman says despite it all, passengers are keeping cool heads, no fights, people working together. >> this is going to be a long day. this is not a process that's going to happen fast. there is no way we can speed up the process sooner. >> reporter: customs
's the price of gas. suddenly sky-high again. >>> there's been another terrorist attack on a u.s. outpost overseas. our own richard engel is there, all of it playing out when we get a new secretary of state. >>> new rules in the ongoing fight over birth control coverage. the president makes an offer. the question is, will religious leaders give it their blessing? >>> and the big game. it's all over, but the shouting, the fans are in place, the excitement is building. oh, but wait. we're talking about the puppy bowl on sunday. "nightly news" begins now. >>> from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >>> good evening. late today the stock market crossed over something of a mythic mark of the modern era and the dow jones industrials closed above 14,000 for the first time since 2007. and we all remember what happened back then. the stock market has been on a tear of late, gaining almost 7% so far this year. s&p and nasdaq also up. we started the day by learning the unemployment rate had inched up to 7.9% again, while the economy actually adde
. >>> blizzard warnings as we storm on the move across the country. they're now using words like crippling and historic to describe it. >>> there's news tonight in the alarming rise in the number of younger women being diagnosed with advanced stage met static breast cancer. it's a bad trend that has doctors concerned. >>> and is it an invasion of privacy? police using modern technology to solve cold cases. but if you've done nothing wrong, is it going too far? "nightly news" begins now. >> announcer: this is "nightly news with brian williams," reporting tonight from washington. >>> good evening, and we are now within 72 hours until those forced budget cuts are imposed on the u.s. economy, and the federal government, again, while they have nothing to do with a jury, they are called the sequester, and americans get to judge for themselves who is telling the truth here. the obama administration is close to running out of dire ways to warn of the consequences. the attorney general of the united states actually said today our country is going to be less safe because of these budget cuts. so, if
evening. the coroner's office will use dental records or forensics to identify christopher dorner. they say his body is burned beyond recognition, but law enforcement sources tell nbc news, make no doubt, this is the suspect. tonight, this rubble is all that remains of the cabin where fugitive christopher dorner made his last stand. the drama began tuesday afternoon, miles away. 12:20 p.m., a 911 call from this cabin. two women who arrived to clean the home surprised dorner who was holed up inside. he tied them up and stole their car. >> did we get a physical on the guy? what is he wearing? >> reporter: dressed in camouflage and armed, dorner drove down a mountain road. he opened fire on fish and wildlife wardens in pursuit. >> the suspect took his weapon out, stuck it out the window of his vehicle, and shot our game warden five times. >> reporter: dorner crashed the car, then carjacked rick heltebrake. >> he pointed a gun at me, i an assault-type rifle. i stopped my truck, put it in park, raised my hands up. he said, "i don't want to hurt you. just get out." >> reporter: but dorn
or serious effort to stop it. in fact, with all of this going on, all of this looming, the u.s. senate made a point of reading george washington's farewell address to the chamber today. something they do every year. but, of course, this is no ordinary time, and to the white house we go. nbc's peter alexander standing by there. peter, good evening. >> reporter: brian, good evening to you. there is bipartisan agreement on one thing, that those sequester cuts will likely go ahead as planned at the end of this week. the white house and congressional republicans have made no progress toward a deal. while there was plenty of talking today, almost all of it was critical of the other side. the latest in the parade of public officials issuing dire warnings, homeland security secretary janet napolitano asked if the cuts would increase the likelihood of a terrorist attack. napolitano went there. >> we're going to do everything we can to minimize that risk but the sequester makes it awfully, awfully tough. >> reporter: back from a ten-day recess, house speaker john boehner. >> if the president was seri
compile the numbers, tell us that so far today, 203 people have been shot in this country. that's just today, and just as of 6:00 p.m. eastern time. among the shootings, kauffman, texas, an assistant district attorney gunned down and killed outside the courthouse where he worked. lincoln, nebraska. a man shot while in his apartment building after two armed men burst in. atlanta, georgia. a 14-year-old student shot in the head at price middle school this afternoon, one person in police custody. and then, of course, there's the city of chicago. more people killed there last year than american troops killed in afghanistan. more than 40 gun murders so far just this year, and today they announced a new strategy. nbc's kevin tibbles starts us off from there tonight. good evening. >> brian, 2013 is barely a month old and already 42 murders in the city of chicago. the latest has galvanized this city into taking action. >> no one gets a pass. >> reporter: today, chicago city officials went on the offensive. taking aim at gun violence by calling for background checks on gun buyers. >> loss of an
they announced a new strategy. nbc's kevin tibbles starts us off from there tonight. good evening. >> brian, 2013 is barely a month old and already 42 murders in the city of chicago. the latest has galvanized this city into taking action. >> no one gets a pass. >> reporter: today, chicago city officials went on the offensive. taking aim at gun violence by calling for background checks on gun buyers. >> loss of any child, in any community, in this city, is a loss to the entire city. reporter: moving 200 more officers from behind their desks to the streets. >> if i have to put a policeman here, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365, we're going to make a point that this territory belongs to the community. >> i'm hadiya, year 2015. >> reporter: the victims have names and families. 15-year-old honor student, hadiya pendelton, has become the latest face of violence in this city. in sixth grade, she took part in an anti gang video. >> your job is to say no to gangs and yes to a great future. >> reporter: despite bylaws that prohibit gunshots within city limits, more than any other city in america, chicago
enforcement, even food inspection. and there are big worries about how it will hit the u.s. economy. >>> his side of the story. an emotional oscar pistorius in court for the first time. what he says really happened the night his girlfriend was killed. >>> and the brazen diamond heist at the airport right on the tarmac. a huge game of deception, $50 million worth of diamonds gone without a trace. "nightly news" begins now. >> announcer: from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news with brian williams." >> good evening. it's an explosive allegation, and it's what we've all been warned about for years since the dawn of the computer age. a u.s. security firm says over 140 targets in this country have been hit electronically by a branch of the chinese military. big companies, you name it, some of the best-known brand names in the u.s. but more troubling than that is the idea that chinese hackers could reach into american society. the systems that run the country, our infrastructure and preserve order like power systems, air traffic, financial industry. it's a sweeping r
against u.s. companies. >> reporter: why is china so aggressive? >> china needs to maintain a very high rate of economic development to keep their citizens happy, to keep their citizens willing to tolerate the kind of oppressive government they've got. >> reporter: president obama signed an executive order last week permitting intelligence agencies to share classified threat data with targeted companies. and calling for voluntary standards to protect vital sectors. banking, the power grid, transportation from attacks. many from china. congress refused to pass legislation last year to improve cyber defenses. republicans objected to new regulations and civil liberties groups worried about privacy. how vulnerable is america? only today the state department is investigating whether one of its associated websites was hacked last night by the activist group known as "anonymous." the attorney general today quoted cyber security experts as saying america now has two types of companies. those who know they have been hacked and those who don't know it yet. brian? >> andrea mitchell in our d.c. ne
friday, calling it almost christmas in february, brian. >> ron mott starting us off in providence, rhode island tonight. take care up there. we want the to show what this looks like from space. look at the tops of the clouds. this is not one but two storms joining together. not visible in that picture, our friend al roker. he's in boston in the thick of it. but it's going to get much thicker as the night goes on. al, tell us about where it is and where we're headed. >> we've been hearing reports about thundersnow in long island and providence, rhode island and power lines and trees are snapping and going down and power outages being reported. we have winter storm warnings up now for interior sections of new york state, new jersey, pennsylvania, all the way into interior new england. but the areas in red from new york to east port, maine, blizzard warnings in effect. very strong winds, very strong accumulations. here, take a look on the radar. you can see all that moisture coming in off the atlantic, the cold air streaming in from the north and where the two meet, that's where we're getti
attacks against 141 u.s. companies spanning 20 industries. whose building is it? according to a new report confirmed by u.s. intelligence, it's the headquarters of unit 61398, the cyber warriors for china's peoples liberation army. >> i think it was time to let the world know, it's actually not just from china, it's the chinese government sanctioning these attacks. >> reporter: among the targets of china's hackers, america's very infrastructure. >> now our enemies are also seeking the ability to sabotage our power grid, our financial institutions, our air traffic control systems. >> reporter: other targets of chinese hackers, familiar brand names like coca-cola, facebook, "the new york times," "washington post" and "wall street journal," and only today, apple. the hackers have user names like ugly gorilla and doda. according to this instructional manual from mandia, the computer security firm that did the study. >> here we see doda logging into one of his operational accounts. he has used this account for spear phishing and generating additional e-mail accounts. >> reporter: what is spear
over $4 and approaching $5 in the coming weeks, brian. >> a lot of money. tom costello starting us off in bethesda, maryland. thanks. >>> olympic track star oscar pistorius is due back in court tomorrow after spending nearly a week now in a jail in south africa, accused of murdering his girlfriend on valentine's day. tonight we're getting new details on what police may have found inside the pistorius' home. nbc's michelle kosinski with us from pretoria, south africa. good evening. >> hi, brian, oscar pistorius months ago made olympic history. this career had him set to race on four continents in the next few months. nike says it will no longer use him in ads. he is here in jail, preparing to face prosecutors in court tomorrow. oscar pistorius, brought to jail on valentine's day, the day his girlfriend was shot to death seen in these exclusive pictures, covering his face with his jacket. since then, visits from his family, agent, friends and lawyers. tomorrow he will be back in court for a bond hearing the same day as reeva steenkamp's funeral. >> just taking things one day at a time. a
. >> that's a buzz cut. >> here's what i've got to ask, half the size of a football field, had it hit us, catastroph catastrophic? >> regionally catastrophic, no doubt about it. you saw what happened with that astroid in russia, the size of a large boulder. this one was much larger. it would hit with much more energy. and the energy has got to go somewhere. and in an air blast, there's heat, there is the posts of a compressive wave, basically a shock wave that can level buildings. you don't want that to happen over a city. and we're happy that most of our surface is ocean and most of earth's land is not inhabited. so you just sort of, you know, count your chances every time this happens. which is why i don't want to run away from these things. i want to deflect them. it would be nice if we had funding to do such a thing. but no such program in the world exists. >> that's nobody discussion. i could talk to you about this all day. we appreciate you coming by. >> excellent, thanks for having me. >>> it's a good night tonight. finally for some 4,000 people trapped aboard a crippled carnival
use in trying. that means rails, roads and especially the air space along the northeast. nbc's rehema ellis is at new york's laguardia airport. she was ordered outside the airport when the inside was shut down late today. raheema, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. this is how the storm is impacting travel. look here at one of the country's busiest airports. new york's laguardia is virtually empty on a friday evening. the monitors inside the terminal tell the story. more than 1,800 cancellations at new york's area airports. connecticut's bradley international airport shut down earlier today. 4,700 flights were cancelled nationwide. yesterday, today and tomorrow. good news for passengers, airlines waived the cabs legislation fees, encouraging passengers to make other plans. overnight, 200 pieces of snow removal equipment will be used to clean the planes and runways, hoping to get operations back on track sometime sunday. and speaking of tracks, amtrak has shut down service between new york and boston with limited service tomorrow. and as ron mott mentioned, a travel ban is
to four. brian? >> miguel almaguer starting us off from l.a. tonight. miguel, thanks. >>> let's go to mike tie even any san bernadino county, just outside of big bear. mike, another loss of life tonight. this just continues to be a rolling nightmare in southern california. set the scene for us there. >> reporter: unbelievable, brian. if this is the last act in this desperate drama, it's not over yet. there may be another victim in this, the gunman, the suspect himself. we don't know yet whether he is still in that cabin. he has not been seen since the smoke started billowing about 4:00 our time. the flames, as you pointed out, started a little over an hour ago there were reports of a single gunshot. one of our colleague, cameraman tim walton, says he was standing and he heard a single gunshot at that point and then rounds going off as though it were rounds being fired off at random because of the fire. that cabin has been surrounded all this time, brian, by law enforcement from every agency you could imagine as you would expect at this point. no one has been seen coming out f someone was c
. president johnson signed the voting rights act in 1965 at the u.s. capitol. fast forward, 48 years. >> i barack hussein obama, do solemnly swear. >> reporter: now with the first african-american president re-elected and more minority in congress and state houses, shelby county, alabama, south of birmingham, says the law renewed in 2006 is so outdated, it's no longer constitutional. >> the america that elected barack obama is not the america of our parents. and our grandparents. >> reporter: the law requires states with a history of discrimination to get federal approval before changing how they conduct elections. all or part of eight southern states are covered. also arizona, alaska and parts of six others. it was used just last year to block strict voter i.d. laws in texas and south carolina. >> it deters and blocks voting discrimination in places in the country where that discrimination has been the most persistent and adaptive. >> reporter: today, the court's four liberals strongly defended it. justice kaygan said the formula for figuring which state needs to be covered seems to be wo
at this time. >>> also in turkey tonight new details are emerging about the suicide bomber who attacked the u.s. embassy in ankora killing a turkish security guard and himself. nbc's chief foreign correspondent richard engel is in ankora with that and developing news out of egypt tonight as well. >> reporter: we are learning from turkish officials the bomber was a well known militant from a far left group and he served more than four years in a turkish prison, was involved in a hunger strike, and was eventually released from jail for medical reasons. he left the country and then returned from greece on a fake passport, but turkish officials don't know how long he's been in the country. they think he's been in ankora for ten days. this isn't the only situation u.s. officials are concerned about in the region. there is also egypt. u.s. officials are worried that ongoing clashes in egypt, including ones in front of the presidential palace, could be a signal that the egyptian government, led by president morsi of the muslim brotherhood is losing control of the streets of egypt, which would be a maj
of a big u.s. city. the blast felt a mile away. tonight, they're still digging through what's left. >>> storm warning. a huge winter system on the move. a dangerous mix in 18 states, 30 million americans in the path of this one. >>> and hoop dreams for the unlikely star of the high school basketball team crushing the competition, though he's just about half their size. "nightly news" begins now. >>> from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >>> good evening. growing up in this country, you get accustomed to hearing the united states is the greatest nation on earth and the mightiest military force on the planet. what we don't like is feeling vulnerable, the way we do after we have been attacked. and now that we have learned of a massive cyber attack, electronic espionage allegedly at the hands of a branch of the chinese military, and the kind of attack we've been warned about for years, today the white house took action. the problem is, this wake-up call has already hit a slew of big companies, and could reach into our power grid,
is in daytona with the latest for us tonight. january the net, good evening. >> reporter: good evening to you. it was a jaw-dropping multi-car crash in five-day forecast grandstand on the final lap of this race. the rookie kyle larsen's car went into the fence, his engine caught fire, then spectators say they saw large chunks of debris flying high into the stands. many say they ducked or turned and when they turned around again, they saw many people injured. emergency personnel and first responders were here anyway just in case something happened on the track. they were putting people on stretchers within a minute. all of the drivers that were hurt were treated and released. after the race the winner larry stewart appeared shaken by this, he did not go to the traditional victory celebration. he left quietly. and behind me right now there's a crane and it is replacing that catch fence because we are less than 24 hours away from the daytona 500. it's important to note that this is not the first time this has happened. in 2009, at talladega, eight people were injured after similarly a car crashe
at the end of 2012? congressional republicans and the president reached an 11th-hour deal that brought us back to safer ground temporarily. guess what, tonight almost two months later we're teetering on the ledge again, this time they're calling it sequestration. not as catchy a name but its impact on every single american is no less profound. six days from now, unless a budget deal is reached, a massive round of automatic government spending cuts will go into effect. if you thought the urgency of the situation would have the white house and republicans burning the midnight oil to make a deal you'd be mistaken. nbc's kristen welker is at the white house. to tell us more about what's at stake. kristen? >> reporter: good evening. president obama has said he would be in contact with members of congress, but according to my sources here at the white house and on the hill there have been no top-level discussions today and there is no resolution in sight. at the governors association meeting in washington, bipartisan frustration. >> the uncertainty of sequestration is really harming our states
situation still under way. nbc's miguel almaguer in los angeles starts us off. good evening. >> reporter: brian, good evening it all started this afternoon. the sheriff's department says they received phone call of a reported car and someone who matched christopher dorner's scrip eggs. a short time later, in the woods, they found that car and their suspect. tonight, multiple law enforcement sources tell nbc news it is christopher dorner. shots fired three hours east of los angeles. >> we have the suspect hold up in a cabin. >> reporter: in the mountains of big bear, the manhunt for fugitive christopher dorner comes to an end. >> we hope we can take this guy into custody and we hope that he doesn't hurt anybody else. >> reporter: inside a cabin, the sheriff says the former police officer and accused cop killer barricades himself inside a home. >> stand by. you got three more coming your way. >> reporter: almost immediately, an exchange of gunfire. >> he has got a rifle. >> reporter: with the s.w.a.t. team on scene, two officers are wounded and are airlifted to a local hospital. >> enough
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)